Workshop 20

Thursday, May 7:  2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Workshop Description: Creating a tessellation screen saver

Students will create a GSP tessellation and submit it to be incorporated into a screensaver that can be downloaded by the students. Geometer’s sketchpad is a widely used drawing program incorporated into many, if not all, modern high school geometry classes.  This session will demonstrate how to generate tessellations on GSP and save them appropriately so students can create a screensaver from the class.  I plan on having students demonstrate the creation of these tessellations during the session.  Most high school geometry teachers will be familiar with the generation of tessellations so the focus of the session will be on the appropriate way to crop and save the tessellations so a high quality screensaver can be generated and shared through email or, if available, a central server.

Workshop Presenter: Suzanne Watson

Suzanne is a high school math teacher who uses technology daily.  She has her master’s degree in math through UNH’s MST program, and has been the Teacher Leader for MLTI in her school for the past two years.

Recording of workshop: http://stateofmaine.na4.acrobat.com/p89625488/

Downloads:

Saving a tessellation as an image: PDF

Tessellation rubric: PDF

Tessellations Tricks and Tips: PDF

You can download a trial version of Sketchpad here: http://www.dynamicgeometry.com/Instructor_Resources/Evaluation_Edition.html

2 Responses to Workshop 20

  1. Sooz Watson says:

    I’m really looking forward to this. I promise you will come away with something interesting to share with your students or at the very least a smile on your face! If you don’t have sketchpad on your laptop and are interested in creating a tessellation along with us please download the trial version from the link above. It’s not necessary but I think you’ll enjoy playing with it.

    Sooz Watson, presenter

  2. davidpatterson4 says:

    Suzanne… I thoroughly enjoyed your session. Thanks for sharing your experiences with what were intuitive and “cool” tools, and also for illustrating some great ideas on creating powerful and beautiful math driven art.

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